MiSight® 1 day

New study shows groundbreaking MiSight® contact lens therapy effective in slowing myopia progression in children by 59% over three years

  • Myopia (shortsightedness) prevalence continues to grow and affect children worldwide.
  • CooperVision have reported three-year data from its Clinical Evaluation of the MiSight® Contact Lens Study during the British Contact Lens Association 40th Anniversary Conference in Liverpool, UK. This innovative therapy substantially slows myopia progression and the elongation of the eye as measured by refractive error and axial length at the three-year mark.
  • The data illustrates high satisfaction and acceptance of contact lens wear from children and their parents, rapidly overcoming initial parental apprehension.
  • 41% of children who wore MiSight contact lenses in the study had no significant change in prescription during the three year period compared to only 4% of those who did not.

The groundbreaking contact lens therapy has potential to impact the fast-growing issue of myopia (shortsightedness) among children. The prevalence of myopia is projected to increase from approximately 2 billion people worldwide in 2010 to almost 5 billion people in 20501.

“Myopia’s prevalence has exploded in the past several decades, moving from affecting low double-digit percentages of the general population to now compromising vision for the vast majority of young adults in some countries, especially in East Asia,” said Arthur Back, Chief Technology Officer for CooperVision and a leading voice on myopia management.

Myopia is so much more than a nuisance, as it can rob children of their ability to fully participate in daily life. The long-term consequences for individuals is also well-documented, as myopia can increase the likelihood of conditions such as glaucoma, cataract, retinal detachment and myopic maculopathy if not addressed. Using treatment for myopia in childhood represents a meaningful commitment by parents in the near- and long-term health and well-being of their children. The daily disposable MiSight lens used in this study provides a new approach that’s proving effective at 36 months.

Speaking to optometrists and scientists in Liverpool, UK, Senior Manager of Clinical Research Paul Chamberlain shared the three-year results from the clinical trial which assessed the success of MiSight in reducing the rate of progression of juvenile-onset myopia.

The findings indicated that use of the dual-focus contact lens — which has alternating visual correction and treatment zones — was effective in slowing myopia progression by 59% as measured by mean cycloplegic spherical equivalent (SE) and 53% as measured by mean axial elongation of the eye when compared to the children in the control group wearing a single vision 1-day contact lens.

This is the first prospective randomized controlled study to offer conclusive data for such a high degree of continued efficacy in myopia management using a 1-day soft contact lens at the three-year mark. The contact lens-based approach does not induce common side effects exhibited by some alternative pharmacological therapies.

The dual focus lens was well accepted by children, and did not affect their daily activities such as school work, reading, playing outside, and computer use when compared to the control group. Children in both the test and control groups indicated a higher satisfaction with contact lenses over spectacles. Parents of study participants also had a very positive response, noting their children could mostly manage their lens wear independently.



The dual focus lens was well accepted by children, and did not affect their daily activities such as school work, reading, playing outside, and computer use when compared to the control group. Children in both the test and control groups indicated a higher satisfaction with contact lenses over spectacles. Parents of study participants also had a very positive response, noting their children could mostly manage their lens wear independently.